Tech Trained Monkey

Everyday Problem Solvers

Tag Archives: software development

Why english

As you know (or not) I’m Brazilian. I was born in Brazil, studied in Brazil, I work in Brazil, and (I’m ashamed to say) never been to a English speaking country. Nevertheless my blog is written in English and more often than not I hear the question “Why English? Why not Portuguese?” and I my answer always is “Because I want to reach as many people as possible”. Reaching people is not why I write this blog (my motives are strictly selfish) but it’s the motive why I do it in English.

I also program in English. When people ask me why I reply: Read more of this post

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What is spaghetti code?

One of the easiest ways for an epithet to lose its value is for it to become over-broad, which causes it to mean little more than “I don’t like this”. Case in point is the term, “spaghetti code”, which people often use interchangeably with “bad code”. The problem is that not all bad code is spaghetti code. Spaghetti code is an especially virulent but specific kind of bad code, and its particular badness is instructive in how we develop software. Why? Because individual people rarely write spaghetti code on their own. Rather, certain styles of development process make it increasingly common as time passes. In order to assess this, it’s important first to address the original context in which “spaghetti code” was defined: the dreaded (and mostly archaic) goto statement.  Read more of this post

The “-2000 lines of code” report

First of all I’m sorry I’ve been so absent. I’m working on something of my own and I hope I can make it stable and working properly so I can talk about it here.
Meanwhile I read a nice post and I’m reposting it here:

In early 1982, the Lisa software team was trying to buckle down for the big push to ship the software within the next six months. Some of the managers decided that it would be a good idea to track the progress of each individual engineer in terms of the amount of code that they wrote from week to week. They devised a form that each engineer was required to submit every Friday, which included a field for the number of lines of code that were written that week.
Bill Atkinson, the author of Quickdraw and the main user interface designer, who was by far the most important Lisa implementor, thought that lines of code was a silly measure of software productivity. He thought his goal was to write as small and fast a program as possible, and that the lines of code metric only encouraged writing sloppy, bloated, broken code.
He recently was working on optimizing Quickdraw’s region calculation machinery, and had completely rewritten the region engine using a simpler, more general algorithm which, after some tweaking, made region operations almost six times faster. As a by-product, the rewrite also saved around 2,000 lines of code.
He was just putting the finishing touches on the optimization when it was time to fill out the management form for the first time. When he got to the lines of code part, he thought about it for a second, and then wrote in the number: -2000.
I’m not sure how the managers reacted to that, but I do know that after a couple more weeks, they stopped asking Bill to fill out the form, and he gladly complied.

Top Project Manager Practice: Project Postmortem

You may think you’ve completed a software project, but you aren’t truly finished until you’ve conducted a project postmortem. Mike Gunderloy calls the postmortem an essential tool for the savvy developer:

The difference between average programmers and excellent developers is not a matter of knowing the latest language or buzzword-laden technique. Rather, it can boil down to something as simple as not making the same mistakes over and over again. Fortunately, there’s a powerful tool that any developer can use to help learn from the past: the project postmortem.

There’s no shortage of checklists out there offering guidance on conducting your project postmortem. My advice is a bit more sanguine: I don’t think it matters how you conduct the postmortem, as long as you do it.Most shops are far too busy rushing ahead to the next project to spend any time thinking about how they could improve and refine their software development process. And then they wonder why their new project suffers from all the same problems as their previous project.

Steve Pavlina offers a developer’s perspective on postmortems:

The goal of a postmortem is to draw meaningful conclusions to help you learn from your past successes and failures. Despite its grim-sounding name, a postmortem can be an extremely productive method of improving your development practices.

Game development is some of the most difficult software development on the planet. It’s a veritable pressure cooker, which also makes it a gold mine of project postmortem knowledge. I’m fascinated with the Gamasutra postmortems, but I didn’t realize that all the Gamasutra postmortems had been consolidated into a book: Postmortems from Game Developer: Insights from the Developers of Unreal Tournament, Black and White, Age of Empires, and Other Top-Selling Games (Paperback) . Ordered. Also, if you’re too lazy for all that pesky reading, Noel Llopis condensed all the commonalities from the Game Developer magazine postmortems.

Geoff Keighley’s Behind the Games series, while not quite postmortems, are in the same vein. The early entries in the series are amazing pieces of investigative reporting on some of the most notorious software development projects in the game industry. Here are a few of my favorites:

Most of the marquee games highlighted here suffered massive schedule slips and development delays. It’s testament to the difficulty of writing A-list games. I can’t wait to read The Final Hours of Duke Nukem Forever, which was in development for over 15 years (so it must be a massive doc). Its vaporware status is legendary— here’s a list of notable world events that have occurred since DNF began development.

Don’t make the mistake of omitting the project postmortem from your project. If you don’t conduct project postmortems, then how can you possibly know what you’re doing right– and more importantly, how to avoid making the same exact mistakes on your next project?